Thursday, June 30
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debate reopens in Brussels on whether to label it as tobacco

Carlos MaribonaCONTINUEBrussels Updated:06/30/2022 08:37 a.m. Save Related newsAs happened during the preparation of the European plan to combat cancer, which gave birth to the first Community strategy against this disease, the debate about whether any alcohol consumption (including wine) increases the risk of developing this disease will return to the European Parliament in the coming weeks, as revealed by popular MEPs Dolors Montserrat and Juan Ignacio Zoido during a meeting with representatives of the main wine appellations of origin and the Spanish Wine Federation (FEV) in Brussels. This time it will do so through a new modification of the European Regulation 1169/2011 on food information provided to the consumer (or 'Food Information to...
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Zebras, giraffes… and a cycle race through the Maasai Mara | global development

YoIn the world of long-distance running, East Africans have long been the dominant force, and soon they may also be setting the pace in the whitest of elite sports: cycling. This month, the Migration Gravel Race (MGR) brought together 100 of the world's top cyclists in a four-day showdown on the rocky, red dirt roads of Kenya's Maasai Mara. With a third of the entrants from East Africa, it was a rare opportunity for the region's riders to show they can rival the best.“Cycling is a very Eurocentric sport,” he says Mikel Delagrange, the first move behind the event. “In over 100 years of the world championship, only three athletes outside of Europe have ever won, and they came from the US and Australia.”For 11 years, Delagrange, a human rights lawyer, worked mostly in central and east A...
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Amy & Lan by Sadie Jones review – larks and losses on a rural commune | fiction

AMy Connell and Lachlan Honey are childhood soulmates on a Herefordshire smallholding, closer even than siblings, born just a few days apart. They celebrate their birthdays every summer solstice with a ramshackle picnic on a nearby hill, surrounded by sweaty adults and grubby children. The grownups bring cake and red wine and homemade elderflower champagne. They also drag up a greased wheelie bin full of rats, which have been caught on the farm and need to be released in the wild. The rats squeak and scratch. They make the wheelie bin shake. “I bet they're eating each other,” sniffs one of the kids. “Or having sex.”Throw too many creatures together, one fears, and sooner or later they'll devour each other or start having sex. It's a harsh law of nature, as immutable as the seaso...
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UK house price growth slows, as household incomes are squeezed – business live | Business

Introduction: UK house price growth slows in JuneGood morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of business, the world economy and the financial markets.UK house prices growth slowed this month as the weakening economy, the cost of living squeeze, and rising interest rates cooled the market.Lender Nationwide reports that prices rose by 0.3% this month, a notable slowdown on May's 0.9% house price inflation -- but still the 11th monthly rise in a row.This pulled the annual UK house price growth to 10.7% in June, from 11.2% in May, with most regions seeing a “slight slowing” in annual growth over the last quarter.Nationwide reports that: The price of a typical UK home climbed to a new record high of £271,613, with average prices up over £26,000 in the past year. South West overtook...
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Earthly Order: ‘mercurial professor’ with urgent ideas on climate change | Books

Saleem Ali – whose Twitter bio begins “Mercurial Professor” – is not trying to be the new Stephen Hawking.“People buy all these theoretical physics books in droves because they think having them on the shelves will make them look smart,” opines the distinguished professor of energy and the environment at the University of Delaware. “A Brief History of Time is a very difficult book to read.”Ali believes his own, anecdote-filled book is far more accessible. Earthly Order: How Natural Laws Define Human Life is an ambitious effort to bridge the gap between politics and science, drawing on his experience as a National Geographic field explorer who has worked in more than 150 countries.Ali has three passports, having been born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, moved to Pakistan aged nine and li...
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The first time I’ve enjoyed cycling in a city: my Tour de Copenhagen | copenhagen holidays

This is the first time I've actually enjoyed cycling in a city. Previously I have been a car-watcher on two wheels, a fume-breathing pothole dodger, my existence begrudged by every four-wheeled, “proper” road user. Now, just outside the Tivoli Gardens, an older lady shoots past me on a shopper-chopper with a cheery “Hihi”, which alerts me to the fact that I am on the wrong side of the bike lane. Imagine: a bike lane broad enough to allow safe overtaking. At the traffic lights there is a purpose-built leaning rail so my feet remain on the pedals; once across the junction, there is a waste bin specially angled to catch litter from cyclists. For us Copenhageners, cycling is a way of life, and we are proud to be called the world's best cycling citySophie Hæstorp Andersen, Lord Mayor of...
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Stagflationary global debt crisis looms – and things will get much worse | Nouriel Roubini

The global financial and economic outlook for the year ahead has soured rapidly in recent months, with policymakers, investors and households now asking how much they should review their expectations, and for how long. That depends on the answers to six questions.First, will the rise in inflation in most advanced economies be temporary or more persistent? This debate has raged for the past year but now it is largely settled: “Team Persistent” won, and “Team Transitory” – which previously included most central banks and fiscal authorities – must admit to having been mistaken.The second question is whether the increase in inflation was driven more by excessive aggregate demand (loose monetary, credit, and fiscal policies) or by stagflationary negative aggregate supply shocks (including ...
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UK government to scrap European law protecting special habitats | Environment

Environment secretary George Eustice wants to tear up a key piece of European law that environmentalists say protects cherished habitats in the UK.Eustice told MPs the Habitats Directive was in a list of laws he wanted to amend in the forthcoming Brexit freedoms bill designed to cut red tape, saying it was bureaucratic and fundamentally flawed on multiple levels.The directive has provided protections for UK habitats since 1992. It supports a network of areas – known as Natura 2000 sites – where special habitats are protected. There are more than 320 Natura 2000 sites in England, nearly 900 in the UK and more than 25,000 throughout Europe.Sign up to First Edition, our free daily newsletter – every weekday morning at 7am BSTThe sites offer more protection than the domestic designations, ...
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A journalist is murdered in northeastern Mexico, the twelfth in 2022

AFP Updated:06/30/2022 07:41 a.m. Save Related newsViolence against the press in Mexico claimed a new victim: the journalist Anthony of the Cross died in a attempt in which his wife and daughter were injured, bringing the total number of journalists killed this year to 12 in the country.De la Cruz, a journalist for the regional newspaper Expreso, was attacked on Wednesday morning as he was leaving his home in Ciudad Victoria (northeast Tamaulipas state), according to a statement from the local prosecutor's office.“These crimes will not go unpunished,” Jesús Ramírez, a spokesman for leftist President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, warned on Twitter.Condemning the murder, the governor of Tamaulipas, Francisco Cabeza de Vaca, stated that the docto...
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Chinese plans to save hit a record high in Q2; job concerns rise

Education remained the most popular category for Chinese consumer's planned spending, according to a People's Bank of China survey in the second quarter of 2022.ChinaNews Service | ChinaNews Service | Getty ImagesBEIJING — Chinese consumers' inclination to save is at its highest in two decades, the People's Bank of China found in a second quarter survey.Rather than spend or invest, 58.3% of survey respondents said they preferred to save their money. That's a jump from 54.7% in the first quarter, which already marked the highest on record for the data which goes back to 2002.The new record came as mainland China enforced strict Covid controls in the second quarter to control the virus' worst outbreak in the country since early 2020. Shanghai locked down in April and May, while Beijing...