Saturday, July 2
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Climent, very close to revalidating his title of champion of the Spanish Formula Kite Cup

Paula PerezCastellon Updated:07/02/2022 10:07 a.m. Save The Valencian Alejandro Climent inaugurated the provisional podium both in this fifth regatta of the Cutty Sark “Spirit of Adventure” FKSS and in the simultaneous Spanish Cup of the Formula Kite class. Together with him, the Valencian Kiko Peiró and the Portuguese Tomás Pires de Lima completed the provisional podium of the queen category. The Advanced and F-one Amateur categories are expected to start testing the next day.The well-known Gurugú beach once again welcomed the Formula Kite fleet for the fifth consecutive year since the circuit started, with an easterly wind of between seven and eleven knots of intensity that allowed the regatta committee to hoist the Delta flag around the ...
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EU’s electric vehicle drive leaves supercars at the back of the grid | automotive industry

Petrolhead supercar owners who love the rumble of a V8 and the aroma of exhaust fumes are being told to prepare for a legally enforced smoother and cleaner ride.The EU this week agreed on draft legislation banning the sale of new petrol or diesel cars by 2035, ignoring a plea from Italy for a “Ferrari exception” to allow its supercar industry to continue making its petrol-powered products.After 16 hours of tense negotiations in Luxembourg environment ministers of the 27 countries agreed to the ban as part of the EU's “Fit for 55” plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030.The UK government has already set out plans to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles from 2030, with a similar ban on hybrids five years later.While most of the automotive industry has lon...
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Euro 2022 is here, and can be the living proof women’s football has arrived | Women’s Euro 2022

If a tree falls in the woods but no one is there to see or hear it, does it make a sound?For so long women's football has been that tree, struggling to be seen or heard. There was so little coverage and attendances were so low that you could be forgiven for wondering if matches had even taken place. Now, all eyes are on the tree. There are journalists camped in the woods, laptops at the ready, a crowd has gathered around it and specialists wait nearby. The world has woken up to the existence of the women's game in recent years and is now hungry for more.Finally, the game is being delivered to fans on a plate and the quality is the best it has ever been.When the England captain, Leah Williamson, steps out in front of a sold-out crowd at Old Trafford on 6 July it will be impossible to...
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Denmark Vesey’s Bible review: searing history with lessons for a troubled America | Books

Yon America, it would seem we have arrived at a moment when the “good book” has supplanted our constitution. Unambiguously conceived by the founders, once broadly considered admirable, the separation of church and state is deemed, as the supreme court justice Samuel wing might put it, "egregiously wrong from the start."This is what makes reading Jeremy Schipper's new book, Denmark Vesey's Bible, so instructive. When religion is allowed to overcome and nullify the rule of law, Schipper shows, unless one is an adherent to “the right faith”, one is liable to be out of luck.Beyond the sons of Ham and the people of Kush, one does not get much mention of Africans in scriptural texts. But this hardly stopped Denmark Vesey finding himself and his people there anyway.Born either in West Afric...
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‘It felt like history itself’ – 48 protest photographs that changed the world | Protest

Governments tend to define democracy as narrowly as possible. The story they tell goes as follows: you vote; the majority party takes office; you leave it to govern on your behalf for the next four or five years. If you don’t like one of its policies, your representative will put their own ambitions, party loyalty and pressure from powerful interests aside to ensure your voice is heard.We can trust the government to spend our money wisely; to defend minorities against more powerful or larger groups; to resist undemocratic forces such as oligarchs, the media they control and corporate lobby groups. We can trust it to ensure everyone’s needs are met; workers are not exploited; our neighbourhoods and quality of life are not sacrificed to corporate profits. We can trust it not to abuse the ...
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Nick Kyrgios plays the villain perfectly, but deep down he just wants to be loved | Nick Kyrgios

Yon the mid-90s, when the internet was all prairie-land as far as you could see, there was a genuine feeling this new frontier was a force for enlightenment. Here was a space where the shared human essence could coalesce and commune, a pure shore on which the future would be crafted by gentle, unhurried humans with bulbous green Apple Macintoshes, concerned only with upcycling blogs and really cool typefaces and artisan bagel houses in Prague .The reality has of course been a little different. It turns out our shared human essence isn't a mild dove-like thing, but is instead an ambient swamp of fury, inanity and throbbing human brain gristle. The soundtrack to that collective consciousness is not the music of the spheres but an endless spawn of enraged avatars saying things like “try...
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‘Perfect storm’ of crises is widening global inequality, says UN chief | climate crisis

Humanity is facing a “perfect storm” of crises that is widening inequality between the north and south, the UN secretary general has warned. The divide is not only "morally unacceptable" but dangerous, further threatening peace and security in a conflicted world.The global food, energy and financial crises unleashed by the war in Ukraine have hit countries already reeling from the pandemic and the climate crisis, reversing what had been a growing convergence between developed and developing countries, António Guterres said.“Inequalities are still growing inside countries, but they are now growing in a morally unacceptable way between north and south and this is creating a divide which can be very dangerous from the point of view of peace and security.”Guterres, who spoke to the Guardia...
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Russia-Ukraine war: explosions rock city of Mykolaiv – latest updates | Ukraine

SummaryHello and welcome to the Guardian's continuing coverage of the war in Ukraine. It is approaching 10am in Kyiv and here's a summary of recent developments. Powerful explosions rocked the Ukrainian city of Mykolaiv early on Saturday, the mayor said. Air raid sirens sounded across the Mykolaiv region, which borders the vital exporting port of Odessa, before the blasts. “There are powerful explosions in the city! Stay in shelters!” Oleksandr Senkevich, the eldest, wrote on the Telegram messaging app. It was not immediately known what caused the explosions. Ukraine's state-run nuclear company, Energoatom, has restored its connection between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the surveillance systems of the nuclear plant in the south-eastern city of Zaporizhzhia. Th...
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I’m Sorry You Feel that Way by Rebecca Wait review – family tragicomedy | fiction

RRebecca Wait's new novel invites inevitable comparisons to Meg Mason's runaway success Sorrow and Bliss. Both are about a pair of sisters; both grapple with madness, mad women and intergenerational trauma. Both are actively funny – because of, rather than in spite of, their subject matter. And both are sharp and wry, written with a clever and unusual clarity. To fail to make the connection would be to miss the obvious – and yet both books rather suffer in the comparison. To dwell too hard on the similarities renders them a blur of high emotions and waspish comments, one a little more composed, the other a little more immediate, demanding a favorite where no favorites need to be played. Much, you could say, like sisters.Get the latest literary news, reviews and features to your i...
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NFT sales hit 12-month low after cryptocurrency crash | Non-fungible tokens (NFTs)

Non-fungible tokens have been swept up in the cryptocurrency crash as sales reached a 12-month low in June.NFTs confer ownership of a unique digital item – often a piece of virtual art – upon someone, even if that item can be easily copied. Ownership is recorded on a digital, decentralized ledger known as a blockchain.Sales of NFTs totaled just over $1bn (£830m) in June, according to the crypto research firm Chainalysis, their worst performance since the same month last year when sales were $648m. Sales reached a peak of $12.6bn in January.“This decline is definitely linked to the broader slowdown in crypto markets,” said Ethan McMahon, a Chainalysis economist. “Times like this inevitably lead to consolidation within the affected markets, and for NFTs we will likely see a pullback in ...