Thursday, January 20

Dopamine Dressing: Australian Fashion Connoisseurs in Clothes That Makes Them Happier | Australian fashion


TThe ‘dopamine dressing’ idea – wearing clothes that make you feel happier – has been around for several years, but has reached new heights of relevance in 2021 as we continue to go out less and feel rotten more often.

Feel-good clothing often comes down to aesthetics – pieces that are bright, poppy, or downright cheerful. But an outfit doesn’t have to scream happiness to provoke it.

We asked seven speakers at the Australian Fashion Summit, which is part of the Melbourne Fashion Festival, to share the item that makes them feel the most hopeful.

Yatu Widders-Hunt in her Ngali dress.
Yatu Widders Hunt in her Ngali dress. Photography: Jimmy Widders Hunt

This dress is from the First Nations fashion brand. Ngali and features the work of Gija artist Lindsay Malay. Growing up in Sydney as an Aboriginal youth, I was always looking for pieces that reflected my contemporary identity, but in a way that was grounded in our cultural traditions.

As an adult, I feel like I found that in this dress. It gives me the opportunity to continue our traditions by showing the stories and values ​​that we have. It’s also a great conversation starter and a friendly and beautiful way to share who we are as people. I wore this dress to a fashion event where we shared our favorite First Nations fashion pieces and what they represented to us. It was a day of connection and celebration. I feel nothing but joy in my Ngali.

Audrey Khaing-Jones, CEO of GlamCorner

Audrey Khaing-Jones in a colorful print dress from C / Meo Collective
Audrey Khaing-Jones in a colorful print dress from C / Meo Collective. Photography: Selena McLaren

I love this dress because it reminds me of the first time I wore it to the Australian Fashion Laureate Awards in 2019, presenting the Sustainable Innovation Awards. It was a moment of “pinching me” on how far we’ve come to help reduce fashion waste through rental.

I chose to use the Collective C / Meo Dressed at the time because it was part of our GlamCorner rental deal, and the shape and print made me feel sophisticated yet fun. I liked the dress so much that I bought it at the end of its rental life cycle and it always manages to lift my spirits when I wear it.

Nathan McGuire in his rust orange Handsom shirt.
Nathan McGuire in his rust orange Handsom shirt. Photography: Nathan McGuire

This rust orange shirt from the Melbourne-based brand Handsom is one of my favorites. I was shopping at your store, I saw the shirt in the sale section of the shelf and my eyes lit up. I love bargains.

This piece makes me happy because at that time I had a great focus on developing my wardrobe and wanting to buy key pieces that fit my personal style. The color was perfect and the shirt was very well made. I can dress it up for a night out with friends or make it casual for a coffee break. I have been able to use it at many friends’ events and it has traveled the world with me. This shirt makes me feel safe and comfortable. Our fashion reflects the way we move around the world and this shirt gives me those feelings.

Graeme Lewsey, dressed in his powerful but vulnerable neckerchief and Common Project “pearly white” sneakers.
Graeme Lewsey in her powerful yet vulnerable neck scarf and pearl white Common Project sneakers. Photography: Graeme Lewsey

I love the concept of empowerment attire. Nothing like an overwhelming boost of confidence when you know you have the right outfit. This photo is very recent, taken at the Melbourne Fashion Festival launch at the Government House in Victoria.

This was not going to be my immediate choice, and I’m being a bit brave with this choice, but it’s honest. I was recently diagnosed with cervical cancer and while I am grateful to be in remission, like many cancer warriors, I have taken a hit to the ego and have a few scares to show for it. Wearing this neck scarf was surprisingly powerful. In fact, it highlighted my vulnerability and also gave me some courage. Oh, and there’s always a dopamine rush when you have pearly white stock projects to match any outfit.

Camilla Freeman-Topper, Creative Director of Camilla and Marc

Camilla Freeman Topper in a trench coat of her own design.
Camilla Freeman Topper in a trench coat of her own design. Photography: Camilla Freeman Topper

This Camilla and Marc trench coat makes me feel incredibly sentimental. It has been a key piece in my wardrobe and reminds me of the time I spent studying at the Accademia Italiana Arte Moda in Florence, Italy.

It was such an inspiring time in my life; art, architecture and food, not to mention tailoring education. This piece makes me feel incredibly optimistic and grateful for that wonderful experience.

Andie Halas, Founding Director of Thread together

Andie Halas, in a dress from The Art Club.
Andie Halas, in a dress from The Art Club. Photography: Chloe Paul

This Art Club dress from Heidi Middleton ticks many boxes for me. I’ve always admired Heidi – her business sense, her positive attitude and now, at this stage in her career, her investment in slow fashion with a focus on sustainability. This dress is a great mix of feminine and masculine, which is my style. A classic dress that is based on the traditional men’s shirt, although with the femininity of the fabric and the softness of the ruffle at the waist.

This dress makes me feel strong and at ease and I know I will wear it during the warmer months and for years to come. It’s important to me to buy designs that will last the test of time, that will become trusted friends.

Karen Andrews, Minister of Industry, Science and Technology

Karen Andrews in her pro-science, pro-Dolly long sleeve t-shirt.
Karen Andrews in her pro-science, pro-Dolly long sleeve t-shirt. Photograph: Minister Karen Andrews

This sweater was given to me by my former chief of staff who went off to study medicine. It’s not particularly trendy, but I love the message of being true to who you are.

I think it’s a powerful thing, as a woman in Stem and in politics, to remember that my blonde hair or love of fashion doesn’t define me, just like my favorite singer, Dolly Parton.


www.theguardian.com

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