Wednesday, December 8

Faith in -196C: Pioneers of the Resurrection – A Photographic Essay | Cryonics


IIn Moscow at the end of the 19th century, a librarian of poor origin began to reflect on how the human beings of the future, emerging from a condition of conflict and division, would eventually be able to defeat evil and death through a technological revolution. and cultural. His name was Nikolai Fedorovich Fedorov. Ultimately, the philosopher’s beliefs permeated Russian culture, inspiring scientists, mystics, and artists who shared a peculiar spiritual-philosophical doctrine later known as cosmism.

Moscow, Russian Federation, December 2017. In the museum-library named after Fedorov, some cosmists are preparing celebrations to mark the anniversary of the death of Svetlana Semenova.  Over the years, this place has represented the heart of the Russian cosmist movement and, to this day, it is dedicated to promoting and developing the ideas and thinking of Fedorov.

  • In the library of the museum named after Fedorov, cosmists prepare to commemorate the anniversary of the death, in 2014, of Svetlana Semenova, a leading researcher in the works of Fedorov, whose DNA has been preserved. The library, considered the heart of the Russian cosmist movement, is dedicated to promoting and developing the ideas and thinking of Fedorov.

Cosmists during the annual meeting on the occasion of the anniversary of the death of Svetlana Semenova.
Misha Ivanov and Elena Milova during a conference on the topic of anti-aging and aging.  Transhumanists promote weekly gatherings to raise awareness in the general public.

  • On the left, cosmists during the annual meeting on the anniversary of Semenova’s death. Right, Misha Ivanov and Elena Milova, two delegates at an anti-aging conference.

Anastasia Gracheva, activist of the Russian Cosmist Movement
The grave of Svetlana Semenova in the cemetery of the town of Alabino

  • Semenova’s daughter, Anastasia Gracheva, a Russian cosmist activist, studies objects in the museum. Her mother’s body is preserved by the KrioRus cryopreservation society with the aim of bringing her back to life in the future.

Fedorov’s ideas have been spread by Russian cosmists, whose thoughts have been merged into a broader international philosophical movement known as transhumanism.

Alexey Samykin and Igor Trapeznikov, activists of the Russian transhumanist movement, inside the Kriorus headquarters during the making of the company's documentary on the German channel Galileo.

  • Two transhumanist activists, Alexey Samykin and Igor Trapeznikov, photographed at the KrioRus headquarters during the making of a documentary on the German channel Galileo.

Alexey Samykin and Igor Trapeznikov activists of the Russian transhumanist movement inside the Kriorus headquarters during a cryopreservation exhibition for a documentary on the company of the German channel Galileo.  Cryopreservation of bodies costs around $ 35,000 while cryopreservation of brains costs around $ 18,000.  Cryopreservation of human beings is not reversible with current technology;  Cryonicists hope that medical advances will one day allow cryopreserved people to be revived.

Transhumanism is a cultural movement that promotes scientific and technological discoveries to improve the physical and cognitive capacities of the human being. He believes that a future that most people dismiss as science fiction is just around the corner. Transhumanists say that by 2045, humanity will experience “singularity,” a theory that predicts that human and artificial intelligence may merge.

Filippo Polistena, founder of Polistena Human Cryopreservation, and his collaborators prepare the body of a cryopatient to be sent to Russia in a cemetery in Bologna, Italy, November 2017. Kriorus is making numerous agreements outside of Russia to promote the practice of hibernation and directly carries out the training of collaborators.

  • Filippo Polistena, founder of Polistena Human Cryopreservation, a KrioRus subsidiary, and his colleagues prepare a client’s body in Bologna, Italy, to be shipped to Russia. KrioRus is making numerous deals outside of Russia to promote ‘hibernation’.

One of the Kriorus technicians about to enter the cooling chamber before soaking in liquid nitrogen.  In the cooling chamber, the bodies are covered with dry ice to evenly lower the body temperature to -78 ° C. The use of the mask is mandatory, as the carbon dioxide vapors produced by the sublimation can cause suffocation. .

  • A KrioRus technician prepares to enter a cooling chamber, where bodies are covered with dry ice to lower their temperature to an initial -78 ° C. The mask is necessary to protect against suffocation from the carbon dioxide vapors in the chamber.

During the twice-weekly storage maintenance, Ivan Stepin, deputy director of Kriorus and a member of the transhumanist moment, awaits the end of the storage filling.

  • Ivan Stepin, deputy director of KrioRus and member of the transhumanist moment, waiting for the twice-weekly storage maintenance to be completed.

Russian transhumanists established KrioRus, the first cryopreservation society in Eurasia, in 2003. Today it preserves 81 human bodies, from Russia, the United States, the Netherlands, Japan, Israel, Italy, Switzerland, and Australia, as well as animals. It is based in Sergiev Posad, a residential neighborhood more than two hours north of Moscow.

Outside a liquid nitrogen and dry ice factory called Pole de Frio on the outskirts of Moscow during storage operations.  This company was founded by Russian transhumanists Eugeny Zimin and Andrey Shvedko, who previously worked for Kriorus.  The cost of liquid nitrogen is around 10 rubles (£ 0.1) per liter, while the cost of dry ice is higher, around 80 rubles (£ 0.8) per kg.

Signing a contract to be cryopreserved is an act of faith in scientific research, whose advances in the fields of life extension and medicine lead some people to believe that humanity is inexorably heading towards immortality. While they await the technological hope of resurrection, the bodies of KrioRus customers float in storage units at a temperature of -196C.

With death, the greatest fear of many people, cosmists and transhumanists can offer a seductive myth of immortality.


www.theguardian.com

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