Saturday, February 24

Freezing, Hard Freeze Warnings, Current Alerts


A cold snap in central Florida will bring ultra-low temperatures to the area as WESH 2 News issues a weather impact day on Saturday and a first-day weather warning on Sunday. National Weather has issued a Freeze Warning for the following counties: Coastal Volusia, North Brevard Counties, Orange Counties, Osceola Counties, Seminole Counties, Coastal Flagler Counties, South Brevard County and South Lake County A strong freeze warning is in place for Sumter, Central Marion, Eastern Marion, Inland Flagler, and Western Marion counties. 9 a.m. A wind advisory was issued for coastal Volusia, northern Brevard County and southern Brevard County through 5 p.m. Sunday morning. the all-time low of 31 degrees was first reached in 1966. With temperatures dipping into the 30s and even 20s in northern Central Florida, it’s important to prepare. The First Weather Day Warning means Sunday conditions are likely to affect your family and appears when dangerous impacts are possible. Everything from pipes to plants to swimming pools requires special attention when the temperature reaches 32 degrees or below. As temperatures struggle to get into the lower 50s on Saturday afternoon, they will drop rapidly overnight. Sustained 20 mph winds are expected to play a big factor in making everything feel much cooler. FREEZE WATCHES AND ADVISORIES A hard freeze is on the way for many in Central Florida at 7 am Sunday. A hard freeze occurs when temperatures drop to 28 degrees or below for an extended period of time. The freeze is expected to impact areas northwest of I-4, including Ocala, The Villages, DeLand and Clermont. Parts of St. Cloud and inland areas of Daytona Beach, Palm Coast and Palm Bay could experience a severe freeze. A freeze alert is in effect for all other areas of Central Florida beginning early Sunday morning. This includes Orlando, Kissimmee, Melbourne, and Daytona Beach east of I-95. All freeze advisories are expected to be upgraded to freeze advisories by Saturday. A freeze occurs when temperatures reach 32 degrees or below. At those temperatures, unprotected plants are at risk of being damaged. The National Weather Service warns that during hard freezes, many plants and seasonal vegetation will be destroyed. It is important to take proper precautions during frosts and hard freezes. WIND CHILL ADVISORIES Wind chill advisories will go into effect for all of central Florida on Saturday morning. The advisory begins at 4 a.m. and lasts until 10 a.m. In Orange, Seminole, and Brevard counties, the wind chill advisory means there will be a wind chill of 35 degrees or below for three hours or more with winds of 10 mph or plus. In Lake and Volusia counties, wind chill temperatures will be 30 degrees or lower for three hours or more with winds of 10 mph or greater. No wind chill warnings have gone into effect in Central Florida. If a warning is posted in Orange, Seminole and Brevard counties, it will indicate that the wind chill has reached 20 degrees or below for three hours or more with winds of 10 mph or greater. In Lake and Volusia, a warning occurs when the wind chill reaches 15 degrees or below, for three hours or more with winds of 10 mph or greater. COLD SHELTERS As temperatures continue to drop in the area, many Central Florida counties will open their doors for those in need of warmth. Click here to see the locations and hours of cold shelters in your area. CARING FOR YOUR PLANTS Residents should also take special care of their plants during the drop in temperature. Experts recommend using frost blankets to keep plants healthy during a cold snap. Make sure the blanket is secured with something heavy so the blanket doesn’t blow up if it’s windy. Hanging plants and smaller pots that can be moved indoors. They are very susceptible to colder temperatures. Don’t use anything heavy or made of plastic to protect your plants. According to experts, the main purpose is to provide insulation between the plant and the outside air. Experts say you should cover your plants before it gets too cold outside to trap any residual daytime heat under the covers and next to your plants. It is not only important to keep warm, but also your pets. The general rule of thumb to follow is that if it’s too cold for you, it’s too cold for your pets to be outside. Just like in the heat of Florida, the National Weather Service says never leave your dog or cat alone in the car during cold weather. They advise that you keep your pets indoors if possible, especially if they are sensitive to cold weather due to age, illness, or breed.

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A cold snap in Central Florida will bring ultra-low temperatures to the area as WESH 2 News broadcasts a Weather Impact Day on Saturday and a Weather First Warning Day on Sunday.

National Weather has issued a freeze warning for the following counties: Coastal Volusia, Northern Brevard County, Orange, Osceola, Seminole, Coastal Flagler, Southern Brevard County, and Southern Lake County Counties.

There is a strong freeze advisory for Sumter, Central Marion, Eastern Marion, Inland Flagler and Western Marion counties.

All warnings will expire at 9 am

A wind advisory has been issued for coastal Volusia counties, northern Brevard County and southern Brevard County until 5 p.m.

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Sunday morning is expected to bring freezing temperatures to Central Florida with wind chill values ​​in the 20s.

In Orlando, the temperature is expected to exceed the record low of 31 degrees that was first reached in 1966.

With temperatures dipping into the 30s and even 20s in north central Florida, it’s important to prepare.

The first day weather warning means Sunday conditions are likely to affect your family and appears when dangerous impacts are possible.

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Everything from pipes to plants to swimming pools requires special attention when the temperature reaches 32 degrees or below.

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As temperatures struggle to reach the lower 50s on Saturday afternoon, they will drop rapidly overnight. Sustained 20 mph winds are expected to play a big factor in making everything feel much cooler.

Freeze

Freeze

FREEZING WATCHES AND WARNINGS

A hard freeze is on the way for many in Central Florida at 7 a.m. Sunday. A hard freeze occurs when temperatures drop to 28 degrees or below for an extended period of time.

The hard freeze is expected to affect areas northwest of I-4, including Ocala, The Villages, DeLand and Clermont. Parts of St. Cloud and inland areas of Daytona Beach, Palm Coast and Palm Bay could experience a severe freeze.

A freeze alert is in effect for all other areas of Central Florida beginning early Sunday morning. This includes Orlando, Kissimmee, Melbourne, and Daytona Beach east of I-95.

All freeze watches are expected to be upgraded to freeze warnings by Saturday.

A freeze occurs when temperatures reach 32 degrees or below. At these temperatures, unprotected plants are at risk of damage.

The National Weather Service warns that during hard freezes, many plants and seasonal vegetation will be destroyed. It is important to take proper precautions during frosts and hard freezes.

WIND COLD WARNINGS

Wind chill advisories will go into effect for all of central Florida on Saturday morning. Notice starts at 4 am and lasts until 10 am

In Orange, Seminole and Brevard counties, the wind chill advisory means there will be a wind chill of 35 degrees or below for three hours or more with winds of 10 mph or higher. In Lake and Volusia counties, the wind chill will be 30 degrees or lower for three hours or more with winds of 10 mph or higher.

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No wind chill advisories have gone into effect in central Florida. If a warning is posted in Orange, Seminole and Brevard counties, it will indicate that the wind chill has reached 20 degrees or below for three hours or more with winds of 10 mph or greater. In Lake and Volusia, a warning occurs when the wind chill reaches 15 degrees or below, for three hours or more with winds of 10 mph or greater.

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COLD SHELTERS

As temperatures continue to drop in the area, many Central Florida counties will open their doors for those in need of warmth. Click here to see locations and times for cold shelters in your area.

CARING FOR YOUR PLANTS

Neighbors should also take special care of their plants during the drop in temperature.

Experts advise using frost blankets to keep plants healthy during a cold snap. Make sure the blanket is secured with something heavy so it doesn’t blow up in the wind.

Hanging plants and smaller pots that can be moved indoors. Those are highly susceptible to cooler temperatures.

Don’t use anything heavy or plastic to protect your plants. The main goal is to provide insulation between the plant and the outside air, according to experts.

Experts say you should cover your plants before it gets too cold outside to trap any residual daytime heat under the covers and next to your plants.

KEEP YOUR PETS WARM

It is not only important to keep warm, but also your pets.

The general rule to follow is that if it’s too cold for you, it’s also too cold for your pets to be outside.

Just like in the heat of Florida, the National Weather Service says never leave your dog or cat alone in the car during cold weather. They advise that you keep your pets indoors if possible, especially if they are sensitive to cold weather due to age, illness, or breed.




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