Saturday, December 4

‘Giddy and nervous excitement’: Relieved Melbourne residents enjoy the weekend away from the lockdown | Melbourne


FFrom St Kilda to Coburg, traffic is heavy in Melbourne for the first time in months. Bars are filling up and friends are having long hugs as the blockade capital of the world sheds its Covid restrictions and opens up.

“Melbourne is back!” a man yells out of his car window on Lygon Street in the downtown suburb of Carlton.

While the remaining restrictions mean pubs are far from crowded, Lois, the manager of Brunswick’s oldest pub, Edinburgh Castle, says they have been closed.

Edinburgh Castle pub staff in Brunswick
Edinburgh Castle pub staff in Brunswick. Photograph: Alana Holmberg / Oculi for The Guardian

“The phones didn’t stop ringing all day, a lot of people ask if they can get in for a quick one.”

In the back, Mads White and Eugene Stone-Marques share a medium strength draft beer.

“It doesn’t taste that good … so we’ll level up next time,” says White. “I was trying to relax.

“My social anxiety is somewhat secret … I had a lot of nervous and giddy excitement.”

Eugene Stone-Marques and Mads White have a drink at Edinburgh Castle in Brunswick
Eugene Stone-Marques and Mads White have a drink at Edinburgh Castle in Brunswick. Photograph: Alana Holmberg / Oculi for The Guardian

The pub opening is great they say, but what they’re really hoping for is seeing live music.

“But it is not clear when it will happen correctly,” says White.

Those who couldn’t get a reservation at an elusive pub have organized dinner parties.

Casey Atkins is going to a barbecue at a friend’s house in Essendon. Like many people who go out on Friday nights, you are concerned that the past four months have affected your social skills.

“It feels like nerves before a first date,” says Atkins. “I wonder if people like me. I look good? Will my conversation be enough?

When all you’ve done is stay inside what are you talking about?

“What happened? Sweet F everything. I have nothing to report,” Atkins says. “Now we all have to pretend that for the last three months we have done something exciting and we can fill six hours of socializing. I think there will be dead air.” .

While there are more people away from home than in months, the city is far from getting back to normal.

In Preston, the Raccoon Club is normally (in non-Covid times) packed with locals at 6pm. M. But its doors will remain closed until the state reaches at least 80% complete immunization, says publican Rob Price.

“It’s not worth opening it,” Price says. “We lose more money opening with restrictions than if we stay closed. To remove the support of the companies now is insane. “

Melbourne celebrates as city ends 262 days of lockdown - video
Melbourne celebrates as city ends 262 days of lockdown – video

Many local bars have signs saying they won’t open until the restrictions are lowered further.

“Everything is closed. It was just restaurants,” laments Mads McCormack, who is trying to party with her friend Fallon in Fitzroy.

“There is no one around, the rain is falling. It’s not really pumping, ”says McCormack.

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Other Melburnians make the most of their new freedoms during the day.

John and his four children start early. There are glasses of champagne next to pasta dishes for breakfast at Marios in Fitzroy.

The family spent their last pre-closing dinner at the iconic Brunswick Street restaurant, Fitzroy. On Friday morning they returned to welcome the “new normal.”

Liam, John, Blaire, Sean and Kyle Mantesso share a meal together at Marios Restaurant on Brunswick Street, Fitzroy
Liam, John, Blaire, Sean, and Kyle Mantesso share a meal together at Marios Restaurant on Brunswick Street, Fitzroy. Photograph: Alana Holmberg / Oculi for The Guardian

“We were here the day of the confinement, when it was announced. This table, ”says John. “We have made the return trip.”

“I’ve waited a long time for this,” says her son Liam as their pasta dishes arrive.

The plan for the day? Haircuts – for everyone. And then drinks, for almost everyone.

The couple next door clink their martinis. Mario welcomes you all. “It’s great to be back,” he says as customers walked through the door, scanned the QR code and displayed their vaccination status.

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Up ahead, Neel Morley is getting a haircut.

“We have reservations for the next five weeks,” he says. “I won’t let them keep booking.”

He’s been getting 20 calls a day and expects to see some pretty rare house clippings.

Neel Morley with a client in his salon, Neel Loves Curls at Fitzroy
Neel Morley with a client in his salon, Neel Loves Curls in Fitzroy. Photograph: Alana Holmberg / The Guardian

“Some people have told me ‘don’t judge me by my color’. We have some crazy fringes, ”says Morley.

“I am very grateful. Everybody wants a good haircut and a good laugh and I can give you both. “

Hairdressers aren’t the only places where it’s hard to get a reservation. Hope St, the radio station-turned-bar at Collingwood Yards arts center, is booked through the end of the year and has a 1,200-strong waiting list.

While indoor retail can’t reopen until 80% of the population 16 and older are vaccinated, some businesses are getting creative.

Alpha 60 clothing store owner Alex Cleary and his sister Juliet have set up a curbside pop-up store.

He says clothes haven’t stopped flying off the racks.

“We’re doing everything outside,” Cleary says. “We have a little game to play: you throw the balls into the bucket and you win a prize.”

Juliet Sulejmani, Alpha 60's Fitzroy Store Manager, Adjusts Outdoor Clothes Racks
Juliet Sulejmani, Alpha 60’s Fitzroy store manager, adjusts outdoor clothes racks. Photograph: Alana Holmberg / Oculi for The Guardian

Music is playing, the smoke machine is pumping, and people are yelling as they win packs of coasters and tote bags.

“We will do this during the week while retail can’t open in,” says Cleary. “It’s good, isn’t it?”

In the hidden mosque around the corner, things are a little quieter. On a Friday before Covid, it would be packed for lunchtime prayers.

But congregations of all faiths find it difficult to open up to capacity limits. How do you manage to have only 40 people when your community has 400?

In the city’s CBD you can still feel the silent pull of the confinement. One in five CBD stores is empty and many of its restaurants are empty.

Richie Purwowilianti and Nardia Bunjamin share lunch at Spice World in Melbourne's Chinatown
Richie Purwowilianti and Nardia Bunjamin share lunch at Spice World in Melbourne’s Chinatown. Photograph: Alana Holmberg / Oculi for The Guardian

In Chinatown, Richie Purwowilianti and Nardia Bunjamin are happy to have lunch sitting down.

“This is our first lunch since closing,” says Purwowilianti. “I’m glad the confinement is over and that we can finally get out.”


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