Sunday, February 5

New Hampshire students’ mini boat launched in 2020 found in Norway


Karel Nuncic, a sixth-grade student in Norway, seen with the recovered Rye Riptides miniature boat which was set to sea in October 2020.
  • Students send off mini-boat filled with gifts in 2020
  • Mini-boat GPS tracker goes offline
  • A sixth-grader finds the damaged boat off of a small island in Norway

RYE, New Hampshire—After a group of New Hampshire students built a roughly six-foot-long miniature boat and filled it with gifts in late 2020, they set it out in the Atlantic Ocean, hoping it would eventually wash ashore and be opened by someone across the globe.

While some students at Rye Junior High School wished for it to drift to Europe, then-sixth grader Solstice Reed wasn’t as convinced the voyage would be successful. “Honestly, I thought it would sink,” she admitted.

Fortunately, to her and her peers’ pleasant surprise, Reed’s initial skepticism turned out to be unfounded.

The Rye Riptides boat, equipped with a tracking device, spent 462 days at sea and registered its coordinates at different points throughout its journey. And this month, at long last, a curious sixth-grader in Smølaa small island near Dyrnes, Norway, found the semi-dismantled boat, later bringing it to his school and opening it with his own delighted classmates.

Retired Rye Junior High School teacher Sheila Adams, left, students Caitlin Tabit, Solstice Reed, Molly Flynn, Keira Hagen and Jack Facella and Educational Passages Executive Director Cassie Stymiest show off the map they used to track their miniature boat.

The cross-continent trek for Rye Riptides, which students and now-retired Rye Junior High School science teacher Sheila Adams stuffed with photos of the Rye students, a facemask with their signatures on it, fall leaves, acorns and state quarters, was conducted with the help of Educational Passages. The Maine-based nonprofit’s goal is to teach students about the ocean and its global impacts. It first began working with Adams on the project in 2018.


www.usatoday.com

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