Sunday, December 5

Our Green Royalty – Saving the Planet One Helicopter Ride at a Time | Marina Hyde


I understand why they come out, “but it’s not helpful to do it in a way that alienates people,” explained Prince Charles of Insulate Britain, in an interview this week in which he also revealed, in a somewhat alienating way, that he had had his Aston Martin was converted to run “surplus English white wine and cheese-making whey”.

Finally, a line to outshine Ed Begley Jr from an old episode of The Simpsons, in which the actor explains that his favorite vehicle is “a kart, powered by my own sense of self-satisfaction.” Begley, a deeply committed environmental activist, has always been able to take the trouble to himself, a hobby he feels has never been at the top or bottom of Prince Charles’s to-do list. Or indeed, off the to-do list of the many, many servants who do for him in his many, many residences.

Still, with 16 days to go to Cop26, it appears to be House of Windsor’s week for helpful climate interventions. In terms of truly selfless good deeds, I am hoping Prince Andrew will commit to never again flying to America, nor to any American jurisdiction. When you consider that the Duke of York once gulped down gasoline and headed to New York just to see a peedo and tell him he couldn’t be friends anymore, hey, we’ve all done it, you have an idea of ​​the meaningful lifestyle. compromises this family is willing to make in the course of making ordinary subjects explode before the Marie Antoinette of all this. It is true that these explosions are not good for the cause, but you can not have everything.

Anyway, we had Prince Charles’s interview on Monday, then a withering assessment from Prince William on the various multi-million dollar space programs on Thursday, and more on both shortly. The big news on Friday, however, is that the Queen was heard yesterday at the opening of the Welsh parliament expressing her frustration with the pace of concrete action on climate change. According to His Major, who still doesn’t know which world leaders will appear at next month’s big conference in Glasgow, “It’s really irritating when they speak, but they don’t.”

Totally. The problem is that, even when politicians manage to put climate action in the statute book, there will always be some people who think that these kinds of rules do not apply to them. Or to put it another way: is this the same queen whose lawyers recently lobbied the Scottish government in secret to change a bill to exempt their private properties from a major carbon reduction initiative? Yes. Yes, it is the same Queen. As a result of this, the Sovereign is the only landowner in all of Scotland who does not have to provide renewable energy pipelines on her various properties in the country. What it feels like, hand on heart, “really irritating.”

But let’s go back to Prince Charles, who never lets an interviewer forget that he has been beating the ambient drum for a long time. As he put it in a modest segment in his interview: “Extinction Rebellion came and did a sit-in on my driveway in Highgrove when I was on tour … they left a letter saying … ‘At that point you said so and so, you were right. Then you said something else, you were right. You were right, you were right. That was wonderful, that was the right kind of demonstration as far as I’m concerned. ” Well, quite a bit. Unfortunately, he was unable to convey his approval to XR in person because he was in the Caribbean, in a year in which the royal family’s travels carbon footprint doubled.

Unfortunately, self-righteousness is not a recessive gene in HRH’s somewhat limited pool, and her two sons feel in a unique position to offer recipes for how we – that is, the others – could live better. Thus, Prince William could find himself this week berating the multi-million dollar space race that currently occupies the likes of Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson. According to William, “We need some of the best brains and minds in the world focused on trying to repair this planet, not trying to find the next place to go live … [It] it is really very important to focus on this [planet] instead of giving up and going into space to try to think of solutions for the future. “

If that is only what different individuals are doing. We can’t speak for the ridiculous Branson, of course, although since he was one of William and Kate’s wedding guests, he could presumably be contacted more directly by William to reprimand him. But several space experts have been around since the latter’s interview to explain that Musk’s ventures, in particular, offer hope for progress in saving the weather, and suggest that the prince may not be played on the issue. As stated in this column earlier, I have a lot of sympathy for the criticism of billionaires waving cocks through the space race, but perhaps both myself and William have to admit that as an intellectual point, questioning the fact that all of this is happening in all ranks along with questions like, “Why are there homeless and yet some people have multiple palaces?”

Saving such philosophical puzzles, Prince William had time to push the “fundamental question” of the carbon cost of space flight. An interesting point, and it is not limited to space flights. I happen to live very close to the place in London where a lot of real helicopters take off for the various weekend visits / trips to other properties, and in those days I often wonder if it would sound a little less like a Vietnam movie if there were fewer helicopters. considered essential. As one of the passengers and navigators on these flights, perhaps William could shed more light?

Then again, maybe none of that matters if your dad has compensated by planting Prince George Wood, as Charles has done on one or other of the Scottish estates. Much nicer than a hideous renewable energy pipeline, of course, and presumably a scalable solution for all Scottish citizens.

As for things that Charles and other family members might behold while walking through this private arboretum, are suggestions allowed? If so, and I appreciate that this is an exaggerated theory, I wonder if, in all the years of bewilderment that people didn’t listen to him, Charles ever considered the possibility that the problem was not so much in the message. , as with the messenger.


www.theguardian.com

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