Monday, February 6

Scott orders removal of Russian liquor from stores, promises state sanctions


Vermont Gov. Phil Scott has ordered state agent stores to remove Russian-owned products from their shelves and withhold from buying additional stock until further notice. It makes Vermont the fourth state — including neighboring New Hampshire — to enforce the removal of Russian-owned liquors in response to the nation’s invasion of Ukraine. The move is largely symbolic, one Scott described as a move of unity. “There are few things states can do alone, but I am heartened by the overwhelming and united response from the free world in support of the people of Ukraine,” Scott wrote in a statement. “The Ukrainian people are fighting for the same values we believe in, and we must come together to support them.”The governor has also promised to issue another executive order this week detailing “further action” and state sanctions against Russia. In addition, some bars and liquor stores across New England have taken it upon themselves to remove Russian-produced and Russian-branded products from their shelves. Magic Mountain, a ski resort in Londonderry, Vermont, posted a video on Twitter showing an employee pouring Stolichnaya down the drain and saying: “Sorry, we don’t serve Russian products here.”Some have questioned the effectiveness of such boycotts and acts of perceived solidarity. According to data provided to NPR journalists by the alcohol sales tracking firm IWSR Drinks Market, less than 1% of vodka consumed in the United States is made in Russia. There has also been concern about people disposing of Russian-branded products, which are not actually produced in the nation, out in protest. The Magic Mountain video featured Stolichnaya — which is produced in Latvia. Updates on Ukraine invasionRussian forces shelled Ukraine’s second-largest city on Monday, rocking a residential neighborhood, and closed in on the capital, Kyiv, in a 17-mile convoy of hundreds of tanks and other vehicles, as talks aimed at stopping the fighting yielded only an agreement to keep talking.Amid ever-growing international condemnation, Russia found itself increasingly isolated five days into its invasion, while also facing unexpectedly fierce resistance on the ground in Ukraine and economic havoc at home.For the second day in a row, the Kremlin raised the specter of nuclear war, announcing that its nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missiles, submarines and long-range bombers had all been put on high alert, following President Vladimir Putin’s orders over the weekend.Stepping up his rhetoric, Putin denounced the U.S. and its allies as an “empire of lies.”Click here for the latest updates on the invasion. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Also Read  Syracuse St. Patrick’s parade is on with city snow plow ready to lead the marchers

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott has ordered state agent stores to remove Russian-owned products from their shelves and withhold from buying additional stock until further notice.

It makes Vermont the fourth state — including neighboring New Hampshire — to enforce the removal of Russian-owned liquors in response to the nation’s invasion of Ukraine. The move is largely symbolic, one Scott described as a move of unity.

“There are few things states can do alone, but I am heartened by the overwhelming and united response from the free world in support of the people of Ukraine,” Scott wrote in a statement. “The Ukrainian people are fighting for the same values we believe in, and we must come together to support them.”

The governor has also promised to issue another executive order this week detailing “further action” and state sanctions against Russia.

In addition, some bars and liquor stores across New England have taken it upon themselves to remove Russian-produced and Russian-branded products from their shelves.

Magic Mountain, a ski resort in Londonderry, Vermont, posted a video on Twitter showing an employee pouring Stolichnaya down the drain and saying: “Sorry, we don’t serve Russian products here.”

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

Some have questioned the effectiveness of such boycotts and acts of perceived solidarity. According to data provided to NPR journalists by the alcohol sales tracking firm IWSR Drinks Market, less than 1% of vodka consumed in the United States is made in Russia.

Also Read  When is Diogo Jota playing again? Latest injury update for Liverpool forward star

There has also been concern about people disposing of Russian-branded products, which are not actually produced in the nation, out in protest. The Magic Mountain video featured Stolichnaya — which is produced in Latvia.

Updates on Ukraine invasion

Russian forces shelled Ukraine’s second-largest city on Monday, rocking a residential neighborhood, and closed in on the capital, Kyiv, in a 17-mile convoy of hundreds of tanks and other vehicles, as talks aimed at stopping the fighting yielded only an agreement to keep talking.

Amid ever-growing international condemnation, Russia found itself increasingly isolated five days into its invasion, while also facing unexpectedly fierce resistance on the ground in Ukraine and economic havoc at home.

For the second day in a row, the Kremlin raised the specter of nuclear war, announcing that its nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missiles, submarines and long-range bombers had all been put on high alert, following President Vladimir Putin’s orders over the weekend.

Stepping up his rhetoric, Putin denounced the U.S. and its allies as an “empire of lies.”

Click here for the latest updates on the invasion.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *