Saturday, November 26

Ten years without news from photojournalist John Cantlie



On November 7, the British photojournalist John Cantlie would have turned 52 years old. But in the last ten, nothing has been heard from him, since he was kidnapped along with American reporter James Foley by Islamic State militants in Syria on November 22, 2012. His family recently held a funeral for him, but the truth is It is that, although it is assumed that he is dead, his body has never been found and the terrorists did not announce his murder at any time, a crime they committed with many other hostages in front of the cameras, but neither did they release him. On November 7, the British photojournalist John Cantlie would have turned 52 years old. But in the last ten, nothing has been heard from him, since he was kidnapped along with American reporter James Foley by Islamic State militants in Syria on November 22, 2012. Foley was beheaded in an execution filmed by Daesh representatives. But of Cantlie -his family recently held a funeral for him- and although he is presumed dead, his body was never found and the terrorists did not announce his murder either, a crime they committed with many other hostages in front of the cameras, but neither his release. He was last seen on video recorded in Mosul, Iraq in December 2016, and some believe he was likely killed in the 2017 US-led coalition bombing of the city, but Defense Minister, Ben Wallace insisted in February 2019 that they believed he was alive, though he did not offer any evidence and reiterated that the British government does not pay ransoms. The reporter with whom Cantlie was traveling was beheaded in an execution filmed his kidnapping was the second, after he was taken hostage in July of that same year, although he was later rescued by the Free Syrian Army. He returned to the United Kingdom, and although he had experienced firsthand the danger of that area, as well as others in which he had worked before, such as Afghanistan or Libya, he decided to return. “John knew the dangers of repeatedly going to Syria to document the atrocities President Assad was committing against the Syrian people,” his sister Jessica told the BBC. “I respected his decision to come back and I understood why he felt he had to go,” he said. “He was a good and decent man.” Hampshire-born Cantlie’s imprint did not immediately disappear forever. It is believed that he was held in at least eight jihadist prisons, and over the years he was seen in at least 14 videos alongside other European prisoners, in deplorable conditions, and in some of them he spoke as a spokesman for his captors, against his will. , perhaps willing to pay that price to stay alive until the time of his rescue came. Earlier this year it emerged that he had pleaded with Western governments to pay for the release of him and five other British and American hostages, for which his captors were asking $100 million. “The amount is extremely high, but it is the only way we will be released. If not, we will remain prisoners here until we die, either by natural causes or by execution,” he wrote in a handwritten letter that was secretly delivered to his girlfriend in London by Federico Motka, an Italian aid worker who was released in May. 2014 after a multi-million dollar payment. But his long-awaited rescue did not occur and Cantlie is not only the British hostage who survived his torture the longest, but the only one whose fate is unknown, a tragedy for his loved ones, who continue to live without the possibility of rest that only gives certainty .


www.abc.es

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