Tuesday, June 15

The co-governance farce


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The Government has once again demonstrated that its famous ‘co-governance’ with the autonomies for the management of the pandemic is removable, and a political fraud to apply it at the convenience of the party. The so-called ‘declaration of coordinated actions’ imposed by Carolina Darias on all communities to force them to apply new restrictions on freedom, especially in the field of leisure or hospitality, or with capacity in closed places, is generating growing discomfort. So much so that Madrid or the Basque Country have already warned that they will refuse to apply them, and will even appeal the Health resolution to the courts when it comes into force. Catalonia, Galicia, Andalusia and Murcia have also expressed their rejection, which predicts more territorial convulsions.

This new version of the ‘de-escalation’ that Darias intends to establish imperatively shows that either the Government is still lost in its accumulation of negligence, or directly acts with political bad faith maintaining a tension between autonomies that no one needs. Weeks ago, Pedro Sánchez claimed that Spain did not need more state of alarm. I was right. Furthermore, he argued that the Supreme Court should be the one to establish itself as a parallel legislator and resolve the differences between the autonomies. Again he was shaking off trouble, his specialty. He never raised a plan B to the alarm and never legislated to fill loopholes against a pandemic. Their political problems had to be solved by the judges with legal solutions. And that was all until yesterday, Darias herself said that “the prosecution is not a measure that is being considered at this time”, just the opposite, by the way, of what Carmen Calvo said days ago. However, the Supreme Court yesterday annulled the curfew approved weeks ago by the Balearic Islands as a disproportionate measure. The chaos multiplies with the Government demanding one thing, several autonomies another different, and the Supreme ruling another one. Necessarily, so much confusion provokes decisions like the one adopted yesterday by the United Kingdom, which has excluded the Canary Islands and the Balearic Islands from its list of safe destinations to travel. The setback for Spanish tourism is awesome.

The only solution to avoid rebounding in the pandemic cannot be limited to giving in to what the Government imposes, nor to assuming its rickety concept of freedom. In reality, co-governance does not exist. There is only that order and command so typical of Sánchez’s interventionist look. This Government has already considered the pandemic over on several occasions. His entire propaganda apparatus has conveniently aired it to try to generate favorable moods for Sánchez, as if the vaccination process were a success. But we are June 4 and only one in five Spaniards is really immunized. Health improvises changing at whim the contagion thresholds necessary for some communities to liberalize their schedules and others not. And coincidentally, the most affected communities are just those that are not governed by the PSOE. Even Darias’s pressure on Madrid, where the PSOE was shipwrecked in the May elections, has especially persecutory political characters that have little to do with health statistics. The conclusion is that Sánchez delegates to the autonomies when he feels like it so as not to wear himself out, and he intervenes de facto when it suits him, like now. And then the judicial blows come to him. It is not good that there are regional rebellions. But neither is it that the Government encourages grievances between citizens, businessmen, or territories. The reasonable thing at this stage of the pandemic, with better health and economic expectations for the summer, is for Sánchez and Darias to provide agreed solutions instead of uncertainty. It is cynical to listen to so much Junqueras, and so little to Díaz Ayuso or Urkullu.

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