Wednesday, December 7

This is how the alliances of Bolsonaro and Lula go to win the second round in the presidential elections in Brazil



The result of the Brazilian elections on Sunday, with proposals that lead to very clear and different paths, put an end to the indefinite positions and has led the most important politicians in the country to choose their side of the board. President Jair Bolsonaro came to the fore with the support of the governors of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais. Former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva received the support of former President Fernando Henrique Cardoso (FHC) on Wednesday, and has the support of Simone Tebet and Ciro Gomes, third and fourth in the final vote, practically confirmed. Lula and Bolsonaro finished the first round of the elections on Sunday, with 57.2 million votes (48.4%), and 51.07 million (43.2%), respectively. The result is an advantage of 6 million votes for the leader of the leftist Workers’ Party (PT), which does not guarantee him a possible victory in the second round on October 30. In the dispute between Lulism and Bolsonarism, the flags have been divided between those who prefer respect for democracy and those who say they are against corruption, even knowing that the current president is not without sin. Symbolic weight The support of the former Social Democratic president, FHC (1996-2002) may not have been the most important in terms of transferring potential votes, but it is having a strong symbolic weight, highlighted by the Brazilian media on Wednesday. Cardoso and Lula fought together against the military dictatorship (1964-85), but became opponents when democracy returned. Desktop Code Neste second round I vote for a history of struggle for democracy and social inclusion. Vote in Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. pic.twitter.com/xgs6citdJv— Fernando Henrique Cardoso (@FHC) October 5, 2022 Image for mobile, amp and app Mobile code Neste second vote for a history of struggle for democracy and social inclusion. Vote in Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. pic.twitter.com/xgs6citdJv— Fernando Henrique Cardoso (@FHC) October 5, 2022 AMP Code Neste second vote for a history of struggle for democracy and social inclusion. Vote in Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. pic.twitter.com/xgs6citdJv— Fernando Henrique Cardoso (@FHC) October 5, 2022 APP code Neste second vote for a history of struggle for democracy and social inclusion. Vote in Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. pic.twitter.com/xgs6citdJv— Fernando Henrique Cardoso (@FHC) October 5, 2022 «In this second round I vote for a story of struggle for democracy and social inclusion. I vote for Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva,” declared the respected sociologist, who at 91 years old has been little seen at public events this year, in a post on Twitter. The message was accompanied by two historical photos of both, during the dictatorship and a more recent one of a hug, before Lula’s prison, in 2018. Personal support from Tebet «Thank you for your vote and trust in him. Brazil needs dialogue and peace,” the candidate also replied on Twitter, in the midst of an intense agenda, which included a lunch with Simone Tebet. Despite the low vote of just over 4%, Tebet has been one of the surprises of this election, running for the first time for the Presidency. The senator of the traditional party of the Brazilian Democratic Movement (MDB) will support her individually, because the group, which has participated in all governments since 1985, has divided and has given freedom to its militants to demonstrate as they wish. Related News standard No Lula and Bolsonaro go to an electrifying second round Verónica Goyzueta Former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva has come out in front with 48% of the valid votes, a small advantage over the current president, Jair Bolsonaro Lula also got the support de Gomes, who finally gave in to supporting Lula, very reluctantly. Ciro, who was already a minister of FHC and Lula, had to admit that he has more affinities with the candidate of the Workers’ Party (PT), than with the current president Bolsonaro, always questioned for his authoritarian, discriminatory and controversial positions, and for a number that weighs on his biography, almost 700 thousand deaths during the pandemic, due to denialism and mismanagement. Bolsonaro’s support With a government that brings together many sins and criticisms, Bolsonaro had difficulty stringing together alliances in the first round, unlike Lula who presented himself with the support of a large political front. His surprising growth at the polls, however, has turned him into a row of supporters. The governors of Minas Gerais, Romeu Zema; and from Rio de Janeiro, Claudio Castro, with expressive votes that led them to win the election in the first round, were the first to support him, as well as the governor of São Paulo, Rodrigo García. Bolsonaro achieved an important image with them, supported by the leaders of the three most important states in the country. García, defeated and in third place in the election, with 18% of the votes in the state of São Paulo, created a crisis in his own mandate by supporting the far-rightist. Representative in the state of the Social Democratic Party (PSDB), García’s decision was badly received by his party and by the most important secretaries of his Government, Rodrigo Maia, of Strategic Projects, and the prestigious economist, Zeina Latif, who are considering resigning their charges. Moro, the judge who sentenced Lula Bolsonaro, has also received the support of former judge Sergio Moro, who left the government due to his disagreements over the president’s interference in Federal Police investigations. He has now preferred to ally himself with the president than with Lula da Silva, whom he sentenced to prison on corruption charges. Former promoter Deltan Dallagnol, who acted as an accuser in the famous Lava Jato operation, also aligned himself with Bolsonaro. The distance between the two fronts has never been so opposite and so clear, very different from the times when Lula and Cardoso fought with very similar plans and proposals. In this election, Brazil is divided into two ways of seeing the world


www.abc.es

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *